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burning trailer

The hottest movie at Cannes has a very appropriate title: Burning.

South Korean auteur Lee Chang-dong made a huge splash at the French film festival this week with what critics are hailing as the best film to screen at Cannes. Burning stars Korean star Yoo Ah In as well as The Walking Dead‘s Steven Yeun in a eerily sinister performance that is sure to earn him awards buzz once the movie hits Stateside. But while we wait for the acclaimed thriller to finish making the festival rounds, check out the Burning trailer below.

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Abu Documentary

Filmmakers are adept at the art of disguise, especially when it comes to their own stories. Sometimes it merely involves a change in name and location – Richard Linklater’s Before Trilogy is premised on the director’s real-world romantic encounter – though sometimes it involves experiences being filtered through a lens of genre. Loneliness tone-poems Lost in Translation (Sofia Coppola) and Her (Spike Jonze), for instance, arguably reveal themselves to be companion pieces on the duo’s failed marriage when viewed back-to-back.

There’s no better visual exploration of this facet of storytelling in recent years than Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals. Ford’s sophomore effort sees author Edward Sheffield (Jake Gyllenhaaal) deal, perhaps pettily, with the emotional trauma of witnessing his wife’s infidelity through a car windshield. Sheffield pens a rural rape-revenge novel in which protagonist Tony Hastings (also Jake Gyllenhaal) witnesses physical trauma through a similar window. While Ford’s film cuts incisively at the often-juvenile heart of this disguise and its misuse by many straight male storytellers, the film’s early moments also feature a closeted gay socialite (Michael Sheen) walking around in the ill-fitting visage of a heterosexual. Disguise, as Ford posits, isn’t just a storytelling tool, but a necessary mechanism for survival. What then, one wonders, begins to take shape when a filmmaker strips away both the secret language of visual narrative – an often obfuscating cipher – as well as the walls guarding the secrets of their own life?

Arshad Khan, director and narrator of Abu, is all too familiar with hiding in plain sight. A gay man from a conservative Pakistani background, his family immigrated to Mississauga, Ontario in 1991 when Arshad was just sixteen – too young to have found his footing yet, but too old for a childhood do-over. The film itself comes packaged as a first-person tale about a boy and his father. “Abu” is a loving term for fathers in Urdu, and the film features “Papa Kehte Hain Bada Naam Karega” (“Father Says I Will Make Him Famous”) from Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak, the rare Bollywood father-son songs, immediately following its haunting animated opening. However, Abu spans the breadth of a lifetime of experiences, both personal and collective, both hilarious and heartbreaking, as Arshad Khan bears his soul via lyrical voiceover and personal home videos spanning several decades. Read More »

the house that jack built trailer

Lars von Trier has a new movie on the horizon, and if you’re familiar with his work, you probably won’t be surprised to learn that the movie looks predictably unhinged. The House That Jack Built is a new thriller from the Antichrist director, starring Matt Dillon as an artistic serial killer. Watch the new House That Jack Built trailer below.

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prospect distribution

Prospects prospects are looking bright. The indie sci-fi film starring Pedro Pascal earned raves at South by Southwest, where it quickly became a film festival favorite. And now, Gunpowder & Sky have stepped in to handle the Prospect distribution.

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dune first draft

Denis Villeneuve‘s Dune adaptation is finally coming together. The French-Canadian director gave an update on his highly anticipated take on Frank Herbert‘s notoriously difficult-to-adapt sci-fi series, which has challenged and felled great directors like David Lynch, Ridley Scott, and Alejandro Jodorowsky. Now Villeneuve is stepping up to the plate with his two-part adaptation, having already completed the first draft of the screenplay with screenwriter Eric Roth. And now with the draft of the screenplay out of the way, Villeneuve confirmed that he plans to start pre-production on the film “soon.”

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Man Who Killed Don Quixote clips

Considering its disastrous production history, cinephiles have adopted an “I’ll believe it when I see it” attitude when it comes to Terry Gilliam‘s highly troubled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. But after decades of starts and stops, the day has come where we can believe without a doubt that the movie finally exists. Three actual, honest to God clips from this movie have hit the internet, and you can watch them ahead of the film’s long-awaited premiere during the closing night of this year’s Cannes Film Festival.
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nude review

A row of women, bent over on the river bank, uniform, toiling away at dirty laundry on the outskirts of their village. One of them, Yamuna (Kalyanee Mulay) breaks formation. She turns to dive into the water, and to free herself from the shackles of tradition and gendered expectation. The mere swerve of her foot towards the river feels like an enormous gesture. As she swims to a quiet inlet, she spies on another woman, swinging from the branches, youthful, carefree and detached from concern. But in a moment, that freedom feels curtailed, when a man swims up to the woman on the tree. He is her lover, but there’s something amiss about the setting. Something intrusive about this male presence, sexualizing a moment that ought to feel untethered from time.

Within seconds and without words, Ravi Jadhav’s Marathi-language Nude establishes its emotional stakes, presenting a pristine vision of freedom before snatching it away. The rest of its runtime – a melodic 110 minutes that you’d wish lasted longer – follows Yamuna trying to win back this fleeting feeling. First, by escaping her abusive husband and moving to Mumbai. Next, by becoming a nude model at a college of the arts.

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Jessica Chastain - Saturday Night Live January 2018 Hosts

Everything surrounding Jessica Chastain‘s highly anticipated spy movie 355 has remained top secret. Until now. When the star-studded cast — including Lupita Nyong’o, Marion Cotillard, Penelope Cruz, and Fan Bingbing —united at Cannes, the first few plot details for what sounds like the best spy movie of this decade were revealed. If you weren’t ready to throw all your money at this movie already, be prepared to empty your entire wallet.

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the man who killed don quixote

The troubles never cease for The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. True to its title, the universe seems adamant on striking this project dead, even as the film has been completed and heads to the Cannes Film Festival to make its world premiere. Because now, the distribution of The Man Who Killed Don Quixote — and the health of its director — is at stake.

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the party's just beginning review

Karen Gillan is still a relatively unknown quantity in the U.S. After shooting to cult success in Doctor Who, Gillan muddled through a few obscure comedy roles before getting her big break as Nebula in Guardians of the Galaxy. But her prosthetic-covered, blue painted face has hindered her chance at widespread recognition, though her performance in Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle may have finally earned her the attention she deserves — if people could see beyond the Rock’s pecs.

She deserved to shoot to stardom with the unfortunately titled 2014 TV series Selfie, in which Gillan played a vain, selfish, and damaged heroine addicted to the instant gratification of social media. She gave a stunning performance in a show that was seen by too few and that was gone too soon. But Gillan’s directorial debut, The Party’s Just Beginning, takes that damaged, troubled character and runs with it — spawning an intriguing heroine for a dark, oddball film that deals with the lasting damages of grief.

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